Saturday, 18 April 2009

Anna-Stina


Anna-Stina (ca 1940)
Originally uploaded by Asplund

Here is a photo of my grandmother Anna Maria Kristina (1920-1990) who taught me how to knit and crochet when I was around five years old. She was incredibly productive and creative. If we had lived closer to each other (and I hadn't become obsessed with knitting) I'm sure I would have learnt to sew and weave too, to name just a couple of her other skills. Needless to say, there's no reason to doubt she has knitted the sweater she's wearing in the picture.

I don't think I could ever knit anything without sending her some thoughts - it comes naturally. Of course, I think about her at other times too, but it's nice and somehow comforting to have this special bond with her still.

And today I have so many new knitter friends! Thank you all for kind & flattering words about my knitting and for encouraging comments on my new blog adventure! How could I not have my grandmother part of this new aspect of my knitting, which really is thanks to her?

I'd like to end this post with something she once pointed out to me (which her mother had told her) and that I keep in mind whenever I have to rip out a lot of work or think progress is too slow: No one can tell how long it took you to make something. People will only see how it turned out. Good advice from a good grandmother.

Edited to add: I later discovered it actually works the other way around too! You see, some projects look more complicated than they really are and didn't take nearly as long to make as it might seem.

8 comments:

Rodrigo said...

Very wise words of your grand mother... I will also think about it every time that I have to rip out a lot of knitting (which is very often, hehe)...
Thank you for sharing that with us!!
Kveðja frá Íslandi
R

PS. It is a beautiful picture of your grand mother :Þ

Terry said...

A lovely woman, a lovely sweater and a lovely sentiment. I know you are aware how fortunate you were to have a loved one teach you the art which has become such a steadfast part of your life.

Anonymous said...

I think all of us who have wonderful memories of our parents and grandparents are so lucky. I must remember the great advice she gave you.
Ron in Mexico

Åsa i Skuttunge said...

Hon var en vacker kvinna med kloka tankar din mormor (eller kanske farmor?)Själv lärde jag mig sticka på slöjden av en grinig slöjdlärarinna som tyckte jag var slarvig! Jag hade aldrig börjat sticka igen om jag inte råkat hamna mitt i den värsta stickvågen på 70 talet! Jag gick från en sned lovikka vante till en ribbad halsduk i akryl till en islandströja i tre skutt....

ylva said...

Det där var ord som jag ska bära med mig! Så sant så sant! Min morfar lärde mig att:" fort och väl går aldrig ihop!"det brukar jag också tänka på ibland när jag vill att det ska gå fort , då blir det ofta fel....

Kiwi James said...

It is also wonderful to see how someone can take the skills they have learned develop them in a different direction. Talent is obviously hereditary in your family. Time is indeed a luxurious gift one can use to indulge a special project.

Asplund said...

I'm glad I thought of quoting her words - it's nice to know others appreciate them too.

Åsa, I'm glad you got back into knitting in spite of your early experience. By the way, Anna-Stina was my father's mother. (For those who don't know Swedish we have two words for grandmother in Swedish: mormor "mother-mother" and farmor "father-mother". Same system with grandfather, uncle, aunt, nephew and niece!)

Beate said...

Really good advice-